Whilst adoption of DLNA among mainstream consumers is still very low, Samsung is actually making its @internet service quite useful by adding widgets and content to its service.

BBC just announced that the iPlayer would be available on Samsung TVs. It is a simple idea, and works well. I wonder if the iPlayer3 (the upcoming social version) would also be available on Samsung!

Streaming of content direct to TVs is potentially the biggest opportunity and one of the biggest disruptions to the conventional broadcast value chain. More so if the content producers start doing it themselves. This is likely to be the fastest growing area this year. Samsung have reportedly also signed a deal with MGM films. It is not a bad thought if they start offering access to a library of films just to the people who buy their TVs. I am sure a lot of people would switch to Samsung!

Making the DLNA interface really open source is the next big challenge for all the TV producers. At the moment, Sony, LG, Samsung all have their own versions of media servers- though they do work on some common ones as well. Sony has a lead in this all with their PS3 media server. Other manufacturers who do not really have a stake in integrating some of their other products with DLNA should really just work on a combined open source media server platform.

So it is happening. Finally. Adobe has partnered with TV manufacturers to incorporate Flash directly into TV sets to enable video players, widgets and applications. A step forward towards really converging TV into a smart internet enabled entertainment platform. What is next? Operating platforms and standards for TVs? I have a feeling Windows Media Centre is a thing of the past unless they innovate fast. And for all you know Android might jump up to offer a standardised environment to the likes of Samsung. Touch screen TVs should also not just be restricted to CNN anymore, and will soon be in home. Anyone up for a Giant Android screen or a 50 inch screen iPod touch?

Only if Apple could put this all together in a neat and clean design, and not restrict us to a Quicktime format, we will all be very happy. But such is not life. We will have to live with a less ideal world before our dream screen comes to life. This is just the start of the convergence, and open-source, standardisation, and other such boring debates will have to wait for a bit.